Sunday, September 24, 2017

Blood Moon Tetrads and Triples of 2014-2015 (video)

In 2014, the first of 4 total lunar eclipses occurs on Passover (First Feast Day), April 15, 2014, followed by a solar eclipse on April 29, 2014, then the second total lunar eclipse occurs on the Feast of Succoth (Last Fall Feast Day), October 8, 2014, followed by another solar eclipse on October 23, 2014.

In 2015, the Jewish religious year begins with the total solar eclipse March 20, 2015, then two weeks later the third total lunar eclipse occurs on Passover, April 4, 2015, and then the civil year beginning with the total solar eclipse on September 13, 2015 followed two weeks later by the fourth total blood red moon on the Feast of Succoth, September 28, 2015.

Tetrads of four sequential lunar eclipses with no intervening partial lunar eclipses occurs 6 other times in this century, but this is the only time it occurs on the Jewish holy days of Passover and Feast of Tabernacles.

The last time that four blood red moons occurred together was in 1967-1968, probably related to the recapture of Jerusalem by Israel.  The time that the tetrad occurred before this was in 1949-1950, probably related to Israel becoming a nation.  Before this time, the last occurrence was 1493-1494, probably related to the expulsion of the Jews from Spain.

Since 1 AD, this tetrad has occurred on these holy days a total of 7 times.  In 2014-2015, it will be the 8th time.  It won’t occur again for another 500 years.

The Lunar Tetrad occurs exactly in the middle between the two Lunar Triples seems to place a lot of emphasis on this Tetrad.

The central date in the Tetrad from April 15, 2014 (first blood moon) to September 28, 2015 (fourth blood moon) is January 5, 2015.  For instance, the number of inclusive days between these two dates is 266 days; so if you add half of that number, 133 days, to April 15, 2014, inclusive, the result is January 5, 2015.

The central date between the Triples from December 21, 2010 to January 21, 2019 is also January 5, 2015.For instance, the number of inclusive days between these two dates is 2954 days; so if you add half of that number, 1477 days, to December 21, 2010, inclusive, the result is January 5, 2015.

The emphasis is on the Tetrad, exactly centered between the Triples, not on the January 5, 2015 date itself.  This is just a mathematical way of showing that the Tetrad is centered between the Triples.  That seems very rare indeed.

Also, what is interesting is that each Lunar Triple has a total solar eclipse on the outside of it.  The outside total solar eclipse on the “before” Lunar Triple is actually the 3rd total solar eclipse in the group of 3 total solar eclipses on the first of Av, maybe linking these together in a picture.

And, between each Lunar Triple and the Lunar Tetrad are four solar eclipses (total, annular or hybrid), again bringing symmetry to the picture and possibly highlighting the Tetrad again.

And notice how both Lunar Triples have four partial (not total, annular or hybrid) solar eclipses associated with them in exactly the same arrangement.


Here are the dates of the solar eclipses associated within the Lunar Triples and Lunar Tetrad.  All dates are obtained from NASA eclipse website.  All the solar eclipses on either side of the Lunar Tetrad are exactly equally distanced from the center of the Lunar Tetrad.  For instance the two solar eclipses closest to the center of the Lunar Tetrad, October 23, 2014, and March 20, 2015, are the same distance on either side of the January 5, 2015 date.  This same layout applies to all ten sets of the 20 solar eclipses.

Total, annular and hybrid solar eclipses are very similar to each other, versus a partial solar eclipse.  A total eclipse occurs when the dark silhouette of the Moon completely obscures the intensely bright light of the Sun, allowing the much fainter solar corona to be visible.  An annular eclipse occurs when the Sun and Moon are exactly in line, but the apparent size of the Moon is smaller than that of the Sun. Hence the Sun appears as a very bright ring, or annulus,  surrounding the outline of the Moon.  A hybrid eclipse (also called annular/total eclipse) shifts between a total and annular eclipse. At certain points on the surface of the Earth it appears as a total eclipse, whereas at other points it appears as annular. Hybrid eclipses are comparatively rare.

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